Healthy Cooking Oil – What Cooking Oil Is The Healthiest?

This post contains affiliated links. Please read my disclosure page.

All content within this post is provided for general information only and it is not a medical advice.  Any concerns about your health should be consulted with your doctor or medical professional. 

 

 

Healthy Cooking Oil - What Is The Healthiest Cooking Oil?

Healthy Cooking Oil – What Is The Healthiest Cooking Oil?

 

There are so many different types of cooking oils available.  I have heard that organic oil is healthy so I have been using it for my cooking.   I have also been using avocado oil or coconut oil occasionally. I also used canola oil for quite sometime long time ago although I haven’t used it for a while.  Vegetable oils such as canola, corn, soybean, sunflower oils sound like they are great as cooking oils. After all, they come from vegetables or plants.  They are not like artery clogging animal fats such as butter or lard, right?  While researching healthy cooking oils, I have found out that some vegetable oils are not suitable for high heat cooking. They are actually prone to oxidation and they can produce harmful chemicals which can lead to negative health effects.  I cook and use cooking oil everyday.  Therefore, it was essential for me to research this so that I don’ expose my family and myself to any toxic chemicals on a daily basis.  Even small amounts of toxins can have a negative effect after they are accumulated daily for a long period of time.  Some cooking oils also contain healthy nutrients.  Therefore, I wanted to choose cooking oils that are not only safe but also offer benefits to our health.  In this post, I share with you what cooking oils to avoid and which cooking oils are healthiest when cooking without heat as well as cooking at low, medium or high temperatures.  

 

 

Things to Consider When Choosing A Cooking Oil

 

1. Types Of Fats – Is A Cooking Oil High In Saturated Fats Or In Unsaturated Fats?

First, let’s take a look what type of cooking oils are available.  Cooking oils have both saturated and unsaturated fats.  Some oils will contain more of saturated fats, some oils will contain more of unsaturated fats.  

 

Saturated Fats

Saturated fats come from animals as well as coconut or palm oil. They are solid at room temperature.  Oils that are high in saturated fats include coconut oil and butter.  Saturated fats are found in meat and dairy products, cakes and biscuits. Consuming too much saturated fat is not healthy. Research shows that consuming too much saturated fat raises cholesterol levels in the blood which can lead to stroke or heart attacks.  Most health organizations including the American Heart Association advise people to replace foods high in saturated fats with foods high in monounsaturated and/or polyunsaturate fats (unsaturated fats) to lower cholesterol levels and improve lipid profiles. 

 

Unsaturated Fats

Unsaturated fats come mostly from plants, nuts, and seeds.  They are liquid at room temperature.  They include avocado oil, olive oil, canola oil, grape seed oil, sunflower oil, vegetable oil, sesame oil, safflower oil, soybean, corn oil, and peanut oil.  Unsaturated fats can be either monounsaturated fats or polyunsaturated fats. Eating both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats can be beneficial to your health.  However, they should still be consumed in moderation.    

  • Monounsaturated fats come from avocados, olives, eggs, almonds, nuts and poultry fats.  Monounsaturated fat cooking oils include avocado oil, olive oil and canola oil.
  • Polyunsaturated fats can be found in foods such as vegetable oils, some nuts and seeds.  Sunflower oil, grape seed oil, safflower, corn oil and vegetable oil are high in polyunsaturated fats. 

Research shows that unsaturated fats are better for heart health than saturated fats. Consuming too much saturated fats can raise bad cholesterol (LDL) in your body and prompt blockages to form in arteries.   However, unsaturated fats are more vulnerable to oxidization than saturated fats.   Saturated fats are very stable and do not break easily or react with other molecules.  Therefore, they are less prone to oxidization and chemical reactions during cooking. On the contrary, unsaturated fats are less stable and more prone to react with other molecules.   Unsaturated fats are unstable. This means unsaturated fats are more prone to oxidization and can go rancid or toxic.  In next section, let’s take a look how unsaturated fats can actually be harmful to your health.

 

 

2. Cooking With Heat – Avoid Polyunsaturated Fats

Cooking oil can oxidize when it is expose to oxygen, heat and light.  Oxidation generates toxic chemicals.  How much a cooking oil can withstand oxidation depends on its oxidation stability.  When a cooking oil contains higher antioxidants, it provides more stability against oxidation. Also as I mentioned earlier, saturated fat is very stable when it comes to oxidation.  Polyunsaturated fat, on the other hand, is unstable and prone to oxidation. The fat can oxidize at room temperature slowly over time and go rancid. Heat can also degrade unsaturated fat while cooking and generate chemical reaction.  Oxidation can form free radicals in our food and bodies and accumulation of free radicals in our bodies can lead to unwanted cell damage and cell death.  An oil refining process also weakens oxidation stability of cooking oils since it takes away antioxidants in oil and heat is used.  Saturated fats and monounsaturated fats, on the other hand, are resistant to heating.  Between the two, saturated fats are more resistant to oxidization than monounsaturated fats.  Cooking oils that are high in polyunsaturated fat are very unstable and prone to oxidize.  Therefore, avoid polyunsaturated cooking oils such as sunflower oil, grape seed oil, safflower, corn oil, vegetable oil.   

All fats have a smoking point which the fat starts to burn and produce toxic fumes and chemicals including carcinogens. When a smoking point is reached, there is a bigger chance of cooking oil going through oxidation.  Each oil has its own smoking point. If a fat contains high number of free fatty acids (FFAs), it will break down more quickly and start smoking.  The lower FFAs, the higher the smoke point a fat will have. Generally, refined polyunsaturated vegetable oils such as grape seed oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, corn oil and vegetable oil have a higher smoke point which can accommodate high heat cooking.  However, despite their high smoking points, they are prone to oxidization when the oils are heated due to their oxidation stability.  A smoking point can be a guideline to give you some idea of what type of cooking oil should be used for high heat cooking.  However, it doesn’t give you the whole picture.  Oxidant stability should also be looked at since polyunsaturated fats can produce harmful chemicals while being exposed to continuous heat.

 

Here are some smoking points of cooking oils. 

 

Extra Virgin Olive oil – 325~375°F/ 165~190°C

Extra Virgin, Unrefined Coconut Oil – 350°F/ 175°C

MCT Oil – 302°F/ 150°C 

Butter – 350°F/ 175°C

Unrefined Sesame Oil – 350~410°F/ 175~210°C

Avocado Oil – 375~400°F/ 190~205°C 

Grape Seed Oil-390°F/ 195°C

Canola Oil – 400°F/ 205°C

Vegetable Oil – 400~450°F/ 205~230°C 

Sunflower Oil – 440°F/ 225°C 

Corn Oil – 450°F/ 230°C

Peanut Oil – 450°F/ 230°C

Soy Bean Oil – 450°F/ 230°C

Light/ Refined Olive Oil – 465°F/ 240°C

Safflower Oil – 510°F/ 256°C 

Refined Avocado Oil – 520°F/ 270°C  

 

Also, polyunsaturated vegetable oils have both omega-3 and omega-6.  Our bodies need both omega-3 and-6.  However, we need omega 6 in significantly less amounts.  Scientists have suggested that consuming too much omega-6 with too little omega-3 may contribute to chronic inflammation.  Chronic inflammation leads to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis.  Cooking oils that are high in omega-6 are sunflower oil, corn oil, soybean oil, cottonseed oil.  Some scientists say there is no need to avoid omega-6.  More research may be needed to fully understand the effects of consuming too much omega-6.  If you are concerned, avoid or minimize oils that contain omega-6.   Olive oil, butter, coconut oil, palm oil is low in Omega-6.  Scientists also found that when polyunsaturated vegetable oils such as corn oil or sunflower oil were heated, they generated high concentrations of chemicals called aldehydes.  Aldehydes have been linked to heart disease, dementia and cancer. 

Then how about monounsaturated fats?  Is it okay to cook with monounsaturated fats?  Monounsaturated fats are more stable than polyunsaturated fats.  It can be used for cooking with heat in general.  Monounsaturated fats can lower LDL cholesterol levels and increase HDL.  It can also lower blood pressure, prevent the formation of blood clots and decrease inflammation in the body.  Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil and avocado oil are good for you and can be used for cooking at low-to medium temperatures.  Some avocado oils can be used for high temperature cooking.   Saturated fats are stable and won’t oxidize, therefore, they can also be used for cooking with heat. 

 

 

3. Medium-Chain Triglycerides (MCT) – Is Any Saturated Fat Healthy?

Many health experts and health organization recommends to avoid saturated fats because they can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease due to its ability to raise harmful LDL cholesterol levels.  However, saturated fats such as lard, butter and coconut oil are very stable, provide a long shelf life and they can withstand heat without producing harmful chemicals.  Then could saturated fats be healthy at all? According to the American Heart Association, food high in saturated fats from any source can raise LDL (bad) cholesterol levels in our blood, which can lead to heart disease.   Saturated fats come from animals and they can also come from coconut or palm oil.  Whether saturated fats come from dairy products or coconut oil, they can raise LDL cholesterol levels.  That means saturated fats shouldn’t be consumed more than recommended daily intake which is 13 grams of saturated fat per day.  (About 2,000 calories a day, no more than 120 calories should come from saturated fats.) 

Coconut oil contains about 80- 90% of saturated fat. About 54% of coconut oil is medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs).  Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) in coconut oil contains a high amount of lauric acid, a saturated fat that raises total blood cholesterol levels by increasing both the amount of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (good cholesterol) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (bad cholesterol).   Although lauric acid also raises HDL (good cholesterol), it also raises LDL (bad cholesterol).  Therefore, too much use of coconut oil can lead to weight gain.  Lauric acid which makes up about 42% of fatty acids in coconut oil, on the other hand, generates monolaurin when digested.  Monolaurin kills harmful viruses, bacteria, and fungi and coconut oil is often used for oil pulling or mouth wash.  

Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are actually very healthy fats. MCT saturated fats are metabolized differently than the long-chain triglycerides (LCT).  They are rapidly digested and absorbed by your body. Long-chain saturated fats form 75-80% of our fat cells.  MCTs are broken down in the liver instead of put in to fat storage.  They are absorbed by the blood stream quickly so that the body uses them very fast.  They support metabolism and they’re less likely to be stored as fat.

MCTs in coconut oil contain medium chain triglycerides which are comprised of capric acid, caprylic acid and long chain lauric acid. Lauric acid is digested and absorbed much slower than capric acid and caprylic acid in the body so it is considered a long chain by some experts despite it is a part of coconut oil MCTs.  Coconut oil you usually find at the market has about 54% MCTs which includes lauric acid (42% lauric acid, 7% caprylic acid, and 5% capric acid).   There is an oil called MCT oil or MCT coconut oil.  MCT oil or MCT coconut oil has 100% medium chain triglycerides with no long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). MCT oil is made by removing long-chain saturated fats (removing most of lauric acid) and just leaving medium chain triglycerides, capric acid and caprylic acid, remaining.  (12% of caprylic acid and caprice acid)

MCT oil does not break down or reacts easily with other molecules, therefore, it is highly resistant to oxidation.  It is a lot less vulnerable to oxidative damage than other cooking oils.  Therefore, there is less risk of exposure to toxic chemicals during cooking.   However, coconut oil has a higher smoke point than MCT oil.  Coconut oil has a smoke point of 350°F (177°C) and MCT oil has a smoke of 302°F (150°C).  Although MCT oil has great oxidative stability, it is recommended not to expose too much to heat if you want to get the full effects of nutrients.  

If consumed in moderation, both virgin coconut and mct coconut oil are great cooking oils.  Virgin coconuts have antioxidant properties and vitamin E. The antioxidants include gallic acid, caffeic acid, salicylic acid and p-coumaric acid.  These antioxidants may help protect cells from oxidative damage. Virgin coconuts are also high in minerals such as manganese, copper, iron, selenium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus.   In addition, a 2017 study has found that virgin coconuts prevents liver disease.  Coconut oil is also used for oil pulling or mouth wash for its antimicrobial properties.

 

 

4. GMO Cooking Oils –  Avoid Canola Oil, Corn oil, Soybeans Oil, Cotton Seed Oil

Some widely used vegetable crops come from GMO seeds. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are plants, animals or bacteria and virus genes have been artificially manipulated in a laboratory through genetic engineering.  Most common GMO cooking oils are canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil and cotton seed oil. Approximately 93 percent of the canola grown in the U.S. is from genetically modified seed.  90 percent of corns, 93 percent for soy beans and 88 percent of cotton grown in US are from genetically modified seeds.  Genetically modified crops are controversial.  Currently, there is no clear proof that GMOs is completely safe to the human body. No credible independent long-term feeding studies have been done and the safety of GMOs is unknown.  Researchers have found that babies in utero tested positive for GMO toxins in their blood.  GMO proteins survived human digestion and entered the bloodstream, then into the placenta and into the fetus.  The research noted that developing fetus was highly susceptible to the adverse effects of xenobiotics, a foreign chemical substance.  This is a concern because it can lead to birth defects.   A recent study by the Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT), which used data from the US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency, and multiple medical journal reviews concluded that GM foods can cause major inflammation in the digestive system and intestinal wall especially if you suffer from gluten intolerance.  The study also noted that GM foods can also trigger or lead to the autoimmune disorder, celiac disease.   Also, more than 80% of all genetically modified crops worldwide have been engineered to be tolerant to toxic herbicide such as Roundup. Glyphosate which is a main ingredient in Roundup is classified as ‘probably carcinogenic to humans’.  Herbicide such as Roundup is also known to cause environmental damage.   If you want to avoid cooking oil derived from GMO crops, avoid canola, corn, soybeans and cotton seed oil .  Naturally non-GMO cooking oils include olive oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil.  Currently, there are no GMO olives, coconuts and sunflowers.  Therefore, these cooking oils do not derive from GMO seeds or crops.

 

 

Types Of Cooking Oil – Processed VS Unprocessed

 

Refined VS Unrefined

Unrefined oil is sometimes called a pure, virgin, cold-pressed oil. Unrefined or virgin coconut oil come from fresh, raw coconuts.  The oil is extracted using the cold-pressed method. Cold pressing method does not involve any heat or chemical.  Cold pressing is done by crushing seeds or nuts forcing out oil from them.  No heat is used during this process and the temperature remains below 120 degrees F.  Since oil is extracted right out of seeds or nuts, cold pressed oils retain all their flavor, nutritional value and aroma.  Therefore, cold-pressed oil may be used a lot for skin care or cooking since it retains higher amounts of nutritional value.  However, cold-pressed oil shouldn’t be exposed to a lot of heat.  Unrefined oils have a high FFA content in general and have a low smoke point.  Expeller pressed oil is when oil is squeezed out of coconut meats by a machine.  Intense friction which generates heat and pressure are used for this process. However, no chemicals are used. 

Refined coconut oil doesn’t come from fresh coconut but from dried copra.  Coconut gets bleached, deodorized or refined and become refined coconut oil.  Refined coconut oil doesn’t have any coconut smell or taste.  Often a solvent is used for extraction of oil. A solvent used for extraction of the oil is called hexane.  This chemical is derived from petroleum and crude oil.  When oil is extracted from coconuts, oil doesn’t get extracted fully.  Hexane helps to extract the maximum amount (about 99%) of oil from coconuts.  High heat or steam is used to remove odors.  High heat can make oil go rancid and may kill nutrients in oil.   Due to the hexane and heat involved with refined oils, unrefined oils which are cold-pressed or expeller-pressed will be healthier oils.  Unrefined oils don’t go through processing and aren’t exposed to hexane.  However, some manufacturers choose organic processing for refined oil which don’t involve hexane.  Refined oil, on the other hand, is refined so it is more resistant to heat and have a longer shelf life.   Therefore, refined oil can be used for high heat cooking and frying.  

 

 

Extra Virgin VS Virgin

Virgin oils are extracted without heat or chemicals. Extra virgin oils are the highest grade.  Virgin or extra virgin oils are unrefined and typically cold-pressed.

 

Filtered VS Unfiltered

Filtered or unfiltered is often used with olive oil.  The difference between filtered and unfiltered oil is that unfiltered contains some olive particles being present in the oil.  Therefore, it has a cloudy appearance whereas filtered olive oil has a clearer appearance.  Unfiltered olive oil goes through a decanting process resulting in the same appearance as filtered ones.  This takes about a few months.  Sometimes, this can help you see how recent olive oil was made and how fresh the oil is.  Unfiltered olive oil does not last as long as filtered olive oil.  Filtered olive oil has a longer shelf life.

 

 

Healthy Cooking Oils

 

Best Cooking Oils For Cooking at Low Temperatures or Salad Dressing

Cold-pressed oils are best used in lower temperatures such as salad dressings or dips.  Cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil or MCT coconut oil, hemp oil or flaxseed oil are all good choice for drizzling oil on food without any heat.  Flaxseed oil and hemp oil are both polyunsaturated fats. Therefore, they are not recommended to cook with heat.  You can use olive oil and MCT oil for low heat cooking (113 to 185 °F/ 45 to 85 °C ).  However, it is best to use them without heat to retain nutrients.

 

1. Extra Virgin Organic Olive Oils – No Heat Or Very Low Heat Cooking

Olive oil contains healthy antioxidants and fatty acids.  It is monounsaturated fat which means the oil is somewhat prone to oxidation. Therefore, it is best to use them without heat or very low temperature cooking to minimize exposure to oxidation and also to keep nutrients. 

 

Pompeian Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Olive Oil: Cold-pressed, extra virgin oil from organic olives

Cooking uses: Perfect base for dressings, vinaigrettes and marinades

Certification: USDA certified organic

More Info

 

 

 

 

La Tourangelle, Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Olive Oil:  Cold-pressed, extra virgin olive oil from organic olives

Taste: It has a well-balanced, intense and fruity extra virgin olive oil with hints of freshly cut grass, almond, fresh olive leaves and a bright peppery finish.

Cooking Uses: Great for salads, on pasta, or a cheese plate, our oils create memorable moments around the table

Certification: USDA certified organic, Non-GMO

More Info

 

 

 

ZOE Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Olive Oil: Cold-pressed, extra virgin olive oil from organic olives

Taste: ZOE Organic EVOO is a supple balance of fruit & Butter with an aromatic bouquet of fresh basil, Almond & Artichoke heart with a peppery finish.  It has a full bodied, versatile combination of fresh fruit & luscious butteriness.

Cooking Uses: It’s ideal for light sau·téing, salad dressing & pastas.  It is also perfect for a vinaigrette, bread dipping sauce or drizzled over vegetables.

Certification: USDA certified organic

More Info

 

 

Paesanol USDA ORGANIC UNFILTERED Extra Virgin Olive Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Olive Oil: Cold-pressed, unfiltered, extra virgin olive oil from a blend of organic “Nocellara del Belice”, “Biancolilla” and “Cerasuola” olives, all from the province of Trapani, in Sicily. This olive oil received 3 Gold Medals & 1 Best of Class at L.A. County Fair and Gold Medal at NYIOOC. 

Taste: A grassy, herbaceous and buttery taste with some notes of artichokes, almonds & a mild peppery finish

Smoke Point: Smoke Point tested up to 490 degrees F

Cooking Uses: Salad dressing, dips, sauces, light sau·téing 

Certification: USDA certified organic, IOC Certified, Kosher Certified, Non-GMO Verified, Vegan, Gluten free

More Info

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Organic MCT Coconut Oils – No Heat Or Very Low Heat Cooking

MCT coconut oil has healthy Medium-Chain Triglycerides (MCT) and it has lower smoke point of 302°F (150°C) than other types of coconut oil.  It is recommended to use it without heat or at low temperature cooking such as an addition simmering sauces, coffee, smoothies, salad dressings to get the full benefit of MCT.  

 

Sports Research Organic MCT Oil derived from ONLY Coconut – Healthy Cooking Oil

MCT Oil: USDA Certified Organic MCT oil from organic coconuts (containing C8/C10 Medium Chain Triglycerides)  No Hexane or other solvents used.

Cooking Uses: Coffee, salad dressings, sauce, smoothie

Certification: USDA  Certified Organic, Non-GMO, Vegan certified, gluten-free

More Info

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nature’s Way Organic MCT Oil From Coconut – Healthy Cooking Oil

 

MCT Oil: USDA Certified Organic MCT oil from organic coconuts (containing caprylic and capric acids of Medium Chain Triglycerides)  No Hexane or other solvents used.

Cooking Uses: Coffee, salad dressings, sauce, smoothie, shakes, beverages

Certification: USDA  Certified Organic, Non-GMO, Vegan certified, Paleo certified

More Info

 

 

 

 

 

Nutiva Organic MCT Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

 

MCT Oil: USDA Certified Organic MCT oil from organic coconuts (containing caprylic and capric acids of Medium Chain Triglycerides)  No fillers, additives, hexane or other solvents used.

Cooking Uses: Coffee, salad dressings, sauce, smoothie, shakes, beverages

Certification: USDA  Certified Organic, Non-GMO, Keto certifie

More Info

 

 

 

 

Island Fresh Organic MCT Oil for Keto Diets – Healthy Cooking Oil

MCT Oil: USDA Certified Organic MCT oil from organic coconuts (containing caprylic and capric acids of Medium Chain Triglycerides)  No fillers, added flavor, hexane or other solvents used.

Cooking Uses: Coffee, salad dressings, sauce, smoothie, shakes, beverages

Certification: USDA  Certified Organic, Non-GMO

More Info

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garden of Life Dr. Formulated Brain Health 100% Organic Coconut MCT Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

MCT Oil: USDA Certified Organic MCT oil from organic coconuts (containing caprylic and capric acids of Medium Chain Triglycerides)  No fillers, added flavor, hexane or other solvents used.

Cooking Uses: Coffee, salad dressings, sauce, smoothie, shakes, beverages

Certification: USDA  Certified Organic, Non-GMO

More Info

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Organic Flaxseed Oils – No Heat Cooking

Flaxseed oil contains a type of omega-3 fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) which is very good for our body.  However, more than half of flaxseed oil is polyunsaturated and it is very sensitive to oxygen, light and temperature.  Therefore, flaxseed oil is not recommended for cooking with heat since its nutritional value will change and may oxidize.  It is recommended to drizzle over food. 

 

Barlean’s Fresh Organic Flax Oil. – Healthy Cooking Oil

Flaxseed Oil:  Cold-pressed, USDA Certified Organic flaxseed oil from organic Flaxseed (High in ALA Omega-3 fatty acid: 7,230mg per Tbsp), protected from air and light

Cooking Uses: Enjoy right off the spoon or mix into salad dressings, yogurt, oatmeal, or smoothies

Certification: USDA  Certified Organic, Non-GMO verified, Gluten Free, Kosher

More info

 

 

 

Solgar Earth Source Organic Flaxseed Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Flaxseed Oil:  Cold-pressed, USDA Certified Organic flaxseed oil from organic Flaxseed (High in ALA Omega-3 fatty acid and also contains Oleic Acid, an Omega-9 Fatty Acid), No solvent used. The oil is protected from light and oxygen. 

Cooking Uses: Enjoy right off the spoon or mix into salad dressings, yogurt, oatmeal, or smoothies

Certification: USDA  Certified Organic, Non-GMO verified, Gluten Free, Kosher

More Info

 

 

 

 

 

4. Organic Hemp Oils – No Heat Cooking

Hemp oil or hemp seed oil contains 75-80% polyunsaturated fatty acids.  Therefore, it is recommended not to use for high heat cooking. Rather, it is best to use on salads, dressings, sauces, dips. Hemp has healthy Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and known for helping to relieve pain, provide stress relief, reduce anxiety and promote deeper restful sleep.

 

Nutiva Organic, Cold-Pressed, Unrefined Hemp Seed Oil from non-GMO

 

Hemp Oil:  Cold-pressed, unrefined , USDA Certified Organic flaxseed oil from organic hemp (contains the ideal 3:1 ratio of Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids and is rich in antioxidants and chlorophyll for skin care), No hexane, chemicals or heat are used for extraction

Cooking Uses: Adding to dressings, sauces, and dips

Certification: USDA  Certified Organic, Non-GMO verified

More Info

 

 

 

 

 

Best Cooking Oils For Cooking At Low To Medium Temperature

These cooking oils are for low to medium heat cooking temperatures from 113 to 350 °F (45 to 177 °C).

 

1. Organic Coconut Oils – Low To Medium Heat Cooking

Unrefined coconut oil smokes in the range of 350° F.  A refined coconut oil would have a higher smoke point (just above 400° F).  Having about 50-60% Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs), organic cold pressed, extra virgin coconut oil is great for cooking at low to medium temperatures.  Coconut oil is a saturated fat which has a good oxidation stability.

 

Viva Naturals Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

 

Coconut Oil: Cold-pressed extra virgin coconut oil from fresh, organic coconuts

Smoke Point: With a naturally high smoke point (350°F/177°C), coconut oil is perfect for baking, frying and sautéing. Spread it on muffins or toast for a delightful and delicious alternative to butter.

Certification: USDA Certified Organic, Non-GMO, gluten free  (grown and harvested sustainably without the use of unnecessary additives)

Other Uses: This can be also used for nutrient-rich skin and hair-care treatment as a lotion, body scrub, hair mask or hair conditioner

No refrigeration required.

More Info

Nutiva Organic Cold-Pressed Virgin Coconut Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Coconut Oil: Cold-pressed virgin coconut oil from fresh, organic coconut, gluten-free

This coconut oil contains 63% medium chain triglycerides (50% lauric acid, 13% of caprylic and capric acid)

Smoke Point: Ideal as a medium heat cooking oil with a smoke point of 350°F/ 177°C and perfect for baking, frying and sautéing

Certification: USDA certified organic, Non-GMO, Kosher, gluten free (without the use of dangerous and harmful chemicals, hexane, or heat)

Other Uses: Great for skin, oral and hair care

More Info

 

Nature’s Way Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Coconut Oil: Cold-pressed, unbleached extra virgin coconut oil from organic coconuts, hexane-free.  It contains 62% MCTs (medium chain triglycerides).

Smoke Point: For cooking, baking or sautéing up to 350°F.

Other Uses: Also this coconut oil is great for the skin and hair.

Certification: USDA certified organic, Non-GMO, Pro-cert organic, gluten-free

Naturally melts and becomes liquid at 76°F. Returns to solid when cooled. No refrigeration required.

More Info

 

 

Carrington Farms Organic Virgin Coconut Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

 

Coconut Oil: Cold-pressed, virgin coconut oil from organic coconuts from Philippines, filtered 4 times, chemical-free (hexane free, BPA free packaging)

Smoke Point: Perfect for medium heat cooking up to 350°F

Certification: USDA certified organic, Non-GMO, gluten-free, Kosher

Other Uses:  Also this coconut oil is great for the skin and hair. 

Give Back: Your purchase will help feed 250 kids three days a week through our Carrington Cares program. These children are a part of the local Philippine community where we source our pure organic coconut oil.

More Info

 

2. Partially Refined Non-GMO Avocado Oil

Avocado oil contains healthy fat, oleic acid, omega 3 and 6 as well as antioxidants .  Partially refined avocado oil retains the nutrients and benefits of fresh avocados while maintaining a balanced flavor profile.

 

La Tourangelle Avocado Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Avocado Oil: A blend of virgin cold-pressed avocado oil and refined avocado oil

(No hexane or chemical extraction is used.) The virgin cold-pressed avocado oil contained in our blend has been expeller-pressed at a controlled temperature below 120 degrees Fahrenheit.  

Smoke Point: Good for medium heat cooking up to 375°F

Cooking Uses: Sautéing or stir-frying,

Certification: Non-GMO Verified

More Info

 

 

Best Cooking  Oil For Cooking At High Temperatures And Frying

Saturated fats are stable even cooking in high temperature and won’t go rancid.  Best saturated fat is coconut oil. Any cooking that is done over 350°F (180℃), you can use refined coconut oil.  Stir-frying is usually done at high heat of 350°F~ 400°F.   Frying is done at 350~375°F.   Refined oil is more resistant to heat and refined coconut oil has a higher smoking point. Therefore, refined coconut oil is good for high-heat cooking.  Avocado oil is another good choice for high heat cooking. Refined avocado oil has higher smoking point than unrefined avocado oil. 

 

1. Refined Organic Coconut Oils – High Heat Cooking

Refined coconut oil has a higher smoking point than virgin coconut oil.  Refined coconut oil doesn’t have coconut smell or taste.  When you choose a refined coconut oil, ensure no chemical or hexane is used for extraction of oil from coconuts. 

 

Nutiva Organic Steam Refined Coconut Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

 

Coconut Oil:  Naturally extracted, steam refined from organic coconuts.  This coconut oil contains 63% medium chain triglycerides (50% lauric acid) without the use of dangerous and harmful chemicals or hexane

Smoke Point: It has a higher smoke point at 400°F than virgin coconut oil (350°F) and is perfect for frying and sautéing with a neutral scent and flavor where a coconut flavor is not desired.

Certification: USDA certified organic, Non-GMO, gluten free (without the use of dangerous and harmful chemicals or hexane) Keto certified

Other Uses: Natural skin moisturizer, eye make-up remover, and deep conditioning hair treatment

More Info

 

 

 

BetterBody Foods Pure Avocado Oil Naturally Refined Cooking Oil – Healthy Cooking Oil

Final Thoughts

There is no one perfect cooking oil for every cooking needs.  Some cooking oils are suitable to use in cooking without any heat like when you drizzle oil over food or make salad dressings, sauces or dips.  Some cooking oils are ideal for high heat cooking. You may also like certain tastes of an oil for certain types of dishes you are making .  Heat can oxidize fats, and the oil can produce harmful chemicals and become rancid during cooking.  Therefore, having a few different oils for your different cooking needs will be a good idea.  For me, I eat salads often. Therefore, I decided to rotate between extra virgin olive oil, flaxseed oil, hemp oil, MCT oil to get different nutritions.  I like Pompeian Organic Extra Virgin Olive OilNutiva Cold-Pressed Organic Hemp OilNature’s Way Organic MCT Oil, and Barlean’s fresh flaxseed oil.  For low to medium cooking, I really like Nutiva Extra Virgin Coconut Oil and Primal Kitchen Cold-Pressed Avocado Oil.   For high heat cooking, I can use Primal Kitchen Cold-Pressed Avocado Oil.  If you are looking for certain health benefits or tastes that oils offer, you can explore to see which one may be right for you and your cooking.  Importantly, it would be best to avoid cooking oils that are high in polyunsaturated fats such as sunflower oil, grape seed oil, safflower oil, corn oil, vegetable oil.  These refined vegetable oils are highly processed and most likely to have gone through oxidization with high heat.  They also lack nutrients and flavor.  Also, if you want to avoid GMOs, you can avoid cooking oils that are most likely coming from GMO crops such as canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil and cotton seed oil.  Also, limit saturated fat daily intake for heart health when using cooking oils that are high in saturated fats.  Happy cooking!

 

 

If you are interested in non toxic dinnerware, please read my post, ‘Non Toxic Dinnerware – Which Dinnerware Is Lead-Free?‘ 

If you are interested in non toxic cookware, please read my post, ‘Non Toxic Cookware Guide – What Is The Healthiest And Safest Cookware?

If you are interested in non toxic bakeware, please read my post, ‘Non Toxic Bakeware Guide – Which Bakeware Is Safe And Non Toxic?

If you are interested in non toxic rice cookers, please read my post ‘Non Toxic Rice Cookers – Rice Cookers With A Stainless Steel Inner Pot‘.

If you are interested in non toxic cutting board,  please read my post, ‘Non Toxic Cutting Board – Which Cutting Board Material Is Non Toxic?’

If you want to find out which bottled water brands are safe, please read my post ‘Safe Bottled Water Guide: Which Bottled Water Brands Are Safe?

 

PLEASE SHARE THIS POST WITH YOUR FRIENDS OR LEAVE ME A COMMENT! 🙂

 

Leave a Reply

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons